How To Maximize Job Security By Secretly Writing Bad Code

Disclaimer: While the tips in this code are absolutely true and will make your code unmaintainable, this post is satire and should be treated as such. Please don’t purposely write bad code in production.

By a sudden stroke of bad luck, half of your team has been laid off due to a lack of budget. Rumor has it that you’re next. Fortunately, you know a little secret trick to ensuring job security in your cushy software development position — by writing bad code of course!

After all, if no one can setup, deploy, edit, or read your code, then that means you’re now a “critical” member of the team. If you’re the only one who can edit the code, then you obviously can’t be fired!

But your code has to pass a bare minimum quality, or else others will catch on to how terrible and nefarious you are. That’s why today, I’m going to teach you how to maximize your job security by secretly writing bad code!

Couple Everything Together, Especially If It Has Side Effects

A little known secret is that you can write perfectly “clean” looking code, but still inject lots of potential bugs and issues into your code, just by unnecessarily flooding it with I/O and side effects.

For example, suppose you’re writing a feature that will accept a CSV file, parse and mutate it, insert the contents into a database, and then also insert those contents into a view via an API call to the database.

Like a good programmer, you could split out the obvious side effects (accepting the CSV, inserting data into a database, inserting data into a view, calling the API and fetching the data) into separate functions. But since you want to sneakily write bad code until the guise of being clean code, you shouldn’t do this.

What you should do, instead, is hardcode the CSV name and bundle all of the CSV parsing, mutation, and all of the insertion into one function. This guarantees that no one will ever be able to write a test for your code. Sure, someone could attempt to mock all of the side effects out, but since you’ve inconveniently bundled all of your side effects together, there isn’t any way for someone to easily do this.

How do we test this functionality? Is it even testable? Who knows?

If someone were insane enough to try, they would first have to mock the CSV out, then mock the CSV reading functionality, then mock the database, then mock the API call, and then finally test the mutation functionality using the three mocks.

But since we’ve gone through the lovely effort of putting everything in one function, if we wanted to test this for a JSON file instead, we would have to re-do all of the mocks. This is because we basically did an integration test on all of those components, rather than unit tests on the individual pieces. We’ve guaranteed that they all work when put together, but we haven’t actually proven that any of the individual components work at all.

The main takeaway here — insert as many side effects into as few functions as possible. By not separating things out, you force everyone to have to mock things in order to test them. Eventually, you get a critical number of side effects, at which point you need so many mocks to test the code that it is no longer worth the effort.

Hard to test code is unmaintainable code, because no sane person would ever refactor a code base that has no tests!

Create Staircases With Nulls

This is one of the oldest tricks in the book, and almost everyone knows this, but one of the easiest ways to destroy a code base is to flood it with nulls. Try and catch is just too difficult for you. And make sure you never use Options/Optionals/Promises/Maybes. Those things are basically monads, and monads are complicated.

You don’t want to learn new things, because that would make you a marketable and useful employee. So the best way to handle nulls is to stick to the old fashioned way of nesting if statements.

In other words, why do this:

try:
    database = mysql_connector.connect(...)
    cursor = mydb.cursor()
    query = "SELECT * FROM YourTable"
    cursor.execute(query)
    query_results = cursor.fetchall()
...
...
except:
....

When you could instead do this?

database = None
cursor = None
query = None
query_results = None

database = mysql_connector.connect(...)
if(database == None):
    print("Oh no, database failed to connect!")
    cursor = database.cursor()
    if(cursor == None):
        print("Oh no, cursor is missing!")
    else:
        query = "SELECT * FROM YourTable"
        if(query == None):
            print("Honestly, there's no way this would be None")
        else:
            cursor.execute(query)
            query_results = cursor.fetchall()
            if(query_results == None):
                print("Wow! I got the query_results successfully!")
            else:
                print("Oh no, query_results is None")

The dreaded downward staircase in this code represents your career and integrity as a programmer spiraling into the hopeless, bleak, and desolate void. But at least you’ve got your job security.

Write Clever Code/Abstractions

Suppose you’re, for some reason, calculating the 19428th Fibonacci term. While you could write out the iterative solution that takes maybe ten lines of code, why do that when you could instead write it in one line?

Using Binet’s formula, you can just approximate the term in a single line of code! Short code is always better than long code, so that means your one liner is the best solution.

But often times, the cleverest code is the code that abstracts for the sake of abstraction. Suppose you’re writing in Java, and you have a very simple bean class called Vehicle, which contains “Wheel” objects. Despite the fact that these Wheel objects only take one parameter for their constructor, and despite the fact that the only parameters that this car takes are its wheels, you know in your heart that the best option is to create a Factory for your car, so that all four wheels can be populated at once by the factory.

After all, factories equal encapsulation, and encapsulation equals clean code, so creating a CarFactory is obviously the best choice in this scenario. Since this is a bean class, we really ought to call it a CarBeanFactory.

Sometime later, we realize that some drivers might even have four different kinds of wheels. But that’s not an issue, because we can just make it abstract, so we now have AbstractBeanCarFactory. And we really only need one of these factories, and since the Singleton design pattern is so easy to implement, we can just turn this into a SingletonAbstractBeanCarFactory.

At this point, you might be shaking your head, thinking, “Henry, this is stupid. I might be trying to purposely write bad code for my own job security, but no sane engineer would ever approve that garbage in a code review.”

And so, I present to you Java’s Spring Framework, featuring:

Surely, no framework could do anything worse than that.

And you would be incredibly, bafflingly, and laughably wrong. Introducing, an abstraction whose name is so long that it doesn’t even fit properly on my blog: HasThisTypePatternTriedToSneakInSomeGenericOrParameterizedTypePatternMatchingStuffAnywhereVisitor

Conclusion

Bad code means no one can edit your code. If no one can edit your code, and you’re writing mission critical software, then that means you can’t be replaced. Instant job security!

In order to write subtle yet destructively bad code, remember to always couple things together, create massive staircases with null checks (under the guise of being “fault-tolerant” and “safe”), and to write as many clever abstractions as you can.

If you ever think you’ve gone over the top with a clever abstraction, you only have to look for a more absurd abstraction in the Spring framework.

In the event that anyone attempts to argue with your abstractions, gently remind them:

  1. Spring is used by many Fortune 500 companies.
  2. Fortune 500 companies tend to pick good frameworks.
  3. Therefore Spring is a good framework.
  4. Spring has abstractions like SimpleBeanFactoryAwareAspectInstanceFactory
  5. Therefore, these kinds of abstractions are always good and never overengineered.
  6. Therefore, your SingletonBeanInstanceProxyCarFactory is good and not overengineered.

Thanks to this very sound logic, and your clean-looking but secretly bad code, you’ve guaranteed yourself a cushy software development job with tons of job security.

Congratulations, you’ve achieved the American dream.

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